ON THEIA
ON THEIA
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Thilo Frank, Infinite Rock, 2013. Steel, aluminium, fabric, glass mirrors, wood, rope, light
Installation view Sharjah Biennial SB 11, UAE 2013B
Thilo Frank, Infinite Rock, 2013. Steel, aluminium, fabric, glass mirrors, wood, rope, light
Installation view Sharjah Biennial SB 11, UAE 2013B
Thilo Frank, Infinite Rock, 2013. Steel, aluminium, fabric, glass mirrors, wood, rope, light
Installation view Sharjah Biennial SB 11, UAE 2013B
Thilo Frank, Infinite Rock, 2013. Steel, aluminium, fabric, glass mirrors, wood, rope, light
Installation view Sharjah Biennial SB 11, UAE 2013B
Thilo Frank, Infinite Rock, 2013. Steel, aluminium, fabric, glass mirrors, wood, rope, light
Installation view Sharjah Biennial SB 11, UAE 2013B
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Song Dong’ Para Pavilion at Venice Art Biennale 2011
Song Dong’ Para Pavilion at Venice Art Biennale 2011
Song Dong’ Para Pavilion at Venice Art Biennale 2011
Song Dong’ Para Pavilion at Venice Art Biennale 2011
Song Dong’ Para Pavilion at Venice Art Biennale 2011
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Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2005

Superabundant Atmosphere, an installation by Jacob Hashimoto includes thousands of shimmering white “kites,” each handmade from silk glued over a tied bamboo frame. During the installation process, Hashimoto and five assistants will string the kites together and suspend them from the gallery ceiling, creating an enormous sculptural cloud rising upward and outward from the rear of the gallery. Although Hashimoto makes use of traditional kite-making materials and techniques, the small kites that form his installations do not actually fly. Instead, they are the modular units that he multiplies and arranges into structures that, while monumental in scale, appear to be weightless. As the light that streams through the gallery’s front window changes throughout the day, so too, will the appearance of Superabundant Atmosphere. Sometimes the installation will seem buoyant and ethereal, while at other times it will appear to be a solid mass. In any guise, Hashimoto intends for Superabundant Atmosphere to convey a sense of wonder and playfulness, as visitors encounter, walk around, and react to its presence.
Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2005

Superabundant Atmosphere, an installation by Jacob Hashimoto includes thousands of shimmering white “kites,” each handmade from silk glued over a tied bamboo frame. During the installation process, Hashimoto and five assistants will string the kites together and suspend them from the gallery ceiling, creating an enormous sculptural cloud rising upward and outward from the rear of the gallery. Although Hashimoto makes use of traditional kite-making materials and techniques, the small kites that form his installations do not actually fly. Instead, they are the modular units that he multiplies and arranges into structures that, while monumental in scale, appear to be weightless. As the light that streams through the gallery’s front window changes throughout the day, so too, will the appearance of Superabundant Atmosphere. Sometimes the installation will seem buoyant and ethereal, while at other times it will appear to be a solid mass. In any guise, Hashimoto intends for Superabundant Atmosphere to convey a sense of wonder and playfulness, as visitors encounter, walk around, and react to its presence.
Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2005

Superabundant Atmosphere, an installation by Jacob Hashimoto includes thousands of shimmering white “kites,” each handmade from silk glued over a tied bamboo frame. During the installation process, Hashimoto and five assistants will string the kites together and suspend them from the gallery ceiling, creating an enormous sculptural cloud rising upward and outward from the rear of the gallery. Although Hashimoto makes use of traditional kite-making materials and techniques, the small kites that form his installations do not actually fly. Instead, they are the modular units that he multiplies and arranges into structures that, while monumental in scale, appear to be weightless. As the light that streams through the gallery’s front window changes throughout the day, so too, will the appearance of Superabundant Atmosphere. Sometimes the installation will seem buoyant and ethereal, while at other times it will appear to be a solid mass. In any guise, Hashimoto intends for Superabundant Atmosphere to convey a sense of wonder and playfulness, as visitors encounter, walk around, and react to its presence.
Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2005

Superabundant Atmosphere, an installation by Jacob Hashimoto includes thousands of shimmering white “kites,” each handmade from silk glued over a tied bamboo frame. During the installation process, Hashimoto and five assistants will string the kites together and suspend them from the gallery ceiling, creating an enormous sculptural cloud rising upward and outward from the rear of the gallery. Although Hashimoto makes use of traditional kite-making materials and techniques, the small kites that form his installations do not actually fly. Instead, they are the modular units that he multiplies and arranges into structures that, while monumental in scale, appear to be weightless. As the light that streams through the gallery’s front window changes throughout the day, so too, will the appearance of Superabundant Atmosphere. Sometimes the installation will seem buoyant and ethereal, while at other times it will appear to be a solid mass. In any guise, Hashimoto intends for Superabundant Atmosphere to convey a sense of wonder and playfulness, as visitors encounter, walk around, and react to its presence.
Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2005

Superabundant Atmosphere, an installation by Jacob Hashimoto includes thousands of shimmering white “kites,” each handmade from silk glued over a tied bamboo frame. During the installation process, Hashimoto and five assistants will string the kites together and suspend them from the gallery ceiling, creating an enormous sculptural cloud rising upward and outward from the rear of the gallery. Although Hashimoto makes use of traditional kite-making materials and techniques, the small kites that form his installations do not actually fly. Instead, they are the modular units that he multiplies and arranges into structures that, while monumental in scale, appear to be weightless. As the light that streams through the gallery’s front window changes throughout the day, so too, will the appearance of Superabundant Atmosphere. Sometimes the installation will seem buoyant and ethereal, while at other times it will appear to be a solid mass. In any guise, Hashimoto intends for Superabundant Atmosphere to convey a sense of wonder and playfulness, as visitors encounter, walk around, and react to its presence.
Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2005

Superabundant Atmosphere, an installation by Jacob Hashimoto includes thousands of shimmering white “kites,” each handmade from silk glued over a tied bamboo frame. During the installation process, Hashimoto and five assistants will string the kites together and suspend them from the gallery ceiling, creating an enormous sculptural cloud rising upward and outward from the rear of the gallery. Although Hashimoto makes use of traditional kite-making materials and techniques, the small kites that form his installations do not actually fly. Instead, they are the modular units that he multiplies and arranges into structures that, while monumental in scale, appear to be weightless. As the light that streams through the gallery’s front window changes throughout the day, so too, will the appearance of Superabundant Atmosphere. Sometimes the installation will seem buoyant and ethereal, while at other times it will appear to be a solid mass. In any guise, Hashimoto intends for Superabundant Atmosphere to convey a sense of wonder and playfulness, as visitors encounter, walk around, and react to its presence.
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Tomás Saraceno, On Space Time Foam, 2012
Tomás Saraceno, On Space Time Foam, 2012
Tomás Saraceno, On Space Time Foam, 2012
Tomás Saraceno, On Space Time Foam, 2012
Tomás Saraceno, On Space Time Foam, 2012
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Alejandro Almanza Pereda, After all these years I realized that it is better to live outside the garden with her than inside without her, 2011
Alejandro Almanza Pereda, After all these years I realized that it is better to live outside the garden with her than inside without her, 2011
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Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
Stephen G. Rhodes, Receding Mind: Circle of Shit, 2010
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La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
La Machine, Aeroflorale II, 2010

For last year’s Bauhaus Color Festival in Dessau, Germany, the renowned French art group La Machine installed this towering kinetic sculpture, complete with hanging vegetation, propellers, fins, and balloons. Dubbed the Aeroflorale II, the 18-meter tall skeletal structure is the latest iteration in La Machine’s long list of theatrical projects, which seek to realize da Vinci’s theoretical machines, particularly his whimsical flying apparatuses, using the industrial aesthetic of Eiffel’s 19th-century iron constructions and the fantastical narrative of Jules Verne’s imaginary chronicles.
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Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
Troika, The Weather Yesterday, 2012
LEDs, aluminium, custom electronics; 2,20 m (H) x 2,20 m (W) x 10 cm (D)

'The Weather Yesterday' takes our obsession with progress ad absurdum by sardonically changing our focus from 'forecast' to the 'past'. The five metre-high sculpture celebrates the weather as a predominant topic of discussion in british culture while offering a spin on the urgency with which we are using our mobile devices, forecasting and interactive technology.
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Song Dong at Pace Gallery
Song Dong at Pace Gallery
Song Dong at Pace Gallery
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Diana Al-Hadid, Tomorrow’s Superstitions, 2008 
Polystyrene, polymer gypsum, steel, silverleaf, paint; 60” x 48” x 90”
Diana Al-Hadid, Tomorrow’s Superstitions, 2008 
Polystyrene, polymer gypsum, steel, silverleaf, paint; 60” x 48” x 90”